18.11.12

Creepy jewelry

Looking at some jewelry of the 19th century I'm asking myself how was that possible that someone actually wore them? Because for me they are rather creepy.

Blue creeper birds' heads earrings. Horniman Museum, London

Taxidermy birds, real beetles, monkey teeth and tiger claws jewelry was very popular in England during the second half of the 19th century. It is said that as the world became more industrialized it was a way for the wearer to maintain a connection with nature. Rather a strange way in my opinion - to adorn oneself with something that once was a living creature.

Hummingbirds necklace. The British Museum

Hummingbirds earrings

Scarab beetles bracelet

Monkey teeth necklace. Horniman Museum, London

Tiger claws brooch. The British Museum

And the following jewelries are creepy for me for another reason - they just look disturbing. These pieces are commonly called "lover’s eye" miniatures, and they were very popular in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The idea was quite interesting and romantic: since just the eye of one’s lover was visible, the piece could be worn while the identity of the lover remained secret. Though another explanations says that the eye symbolized the ever-watchfulness of one’s lover. Anyway, the look of these brooches makes me feel uncomfortable.





And how about you, would you wear anything of the kind if it is in fashion?


5 comments:

  1. I love, love it, ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh
    I must be creepy myself, lol
    Have a fantastic Sunday
    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

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  2. You are not creepy, you are extravagant :)

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  3. I wouldn't wear the birds but I would wear the eyes brooches especially when they are not in fashion. But you're right. They're a little bit disturbing. Thank you for sharing this uncommon information. I've never heard about jewellery with real birds.

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  4. I actually like the look on the scarab beetle bracelet, I don't know about anyone else... so much so I'm probably going to buy it in the future.

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